8 personal values that you can tweet

Keep it simple. To me, this means breaking things down into 3’s. What do you value?

According to my personal coach, Joe Cohen, personal values are a powerful tool for evaluating what’s important.

Here is a list of eight of my personal values. Since what we value influences our behavior, think of this as a “user guide” to Eisaiah.

Which of these values do we share? I want to hear from you on Twitter! Tag me @eisaiah_e.

Invest long-term. To me, this means committing to productivity growth. What do you value? @eisaiah_e @j40pillars #personalvalues #personalgrowth #positivity #success #selfdiscovery

Invest long-term. To me, this means committing to productivity growth.

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Update: Founder Friendly Standard v1.1

Pictures of Founder Friendly Standard Authors
Pictures of Founder Friendly Standard Authors
Founder Friendly Standard Authors: Dan Flanegan, Eisaiah Engel, Adam Bloom

Founder Friendly Standard v1.0 has been updated today. The new version of the standard is 1.1. Here is a description of the change:

  • Section 2.4 – clarifying language (in bold) has been added for companies outside of the United States. The section now reads: Due to potentially devastating tax consequences, the company tells individuals receiving sweat equity in the United States to consult with a tax professional about making an election under Section 83(b) of the Internal Revenue Code. Founders who live or pay taxes outside the United States are similarly advised to consult tax professionals about applicable local and national taxes.

The change has been applied to:

Grays Sports Almanac for Venture Capital

Grays Sports Almanac for Venture Capital - A new standard for optionality to beat the odds
Grays Sports Almanac for Venture Capital - A new standard for optionality to beat the odds
Grays Sports Almanac for Venture Capital on Amazon, Audible, and iTunes.

Executive Summary

Grays Sports Almanac for Venture Capital proposes a new risk management strategy for venture capital. In this investment hypothesis, I outline why a venture fund might beat the odds by purchasing 2,208 to 4,416 warrants on startups. Startups would operate under a governance framework called the Founder Friendly Standard, which gives entrepreneurs control of their companies. In exchange, the venture fund would have the option to exercise warrants for 15 years—purchasing discounted equity only in the startups that become successful.


This text appears in the introduction to Grays Sports Almanac for Venture Capital, available on Amazon, Audible, and iTunes.

Fortune 500 board member tip for improving customer experience (CX): MAP IT OUT

map-customer-experience-journey

I own a single share in a handful of public companies. Each share gets me into the annual shareholder meeting where I can ask questions to Fortune 500 CFOs, CEOs, and board members. 2018 is my second year going to the meetings, and the strategy is effective at putting me in a room of  15 difficult-to-access people for 30 minutes. Anyone can follow this strategy. If you’re interested in replicating it, check out my portfolio here.

At last week’s shareholder meeting for a major consumer products company, I ran into a former CEO that once worked with a colleague of mine. This CEO was highly focused on the customer and led a Fortune 500 company through a significant growth period—all the way to an acquisition. Now, he’s on the board of several Fortune 500 companies. We’ll call him Mike.

My colleague and I planned a question for Mike about how to keep a company focused on the customer as you transition from an operator (CEO) to an advisor (board member).

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What is the Ray Dalio “All Weather Portfolio” for individual investors?

ray-dalio-all-weather-portfolio-eisaiah-engel

I imagine you landed on this page because you read the Ray Dalio interview in the Tony Robbins book, Money: Master the Game, and you’re trying to remember what percentage (%) of stocks, treasury bonds, gold, and commodities are in the All Weather Portfolio – adapted for individual investors.

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I’ll be the Sean Parker to your Mark Zuckerberg

Sean-Parker_Mark-Zuckerberg

When I was in my 20s, I met Gk Parish-Philp, a co-founder of DivX. I asked him how to get investors for my startup. He said, “You don’t want investors. They’ll take too much control.”

“That can’t happen to me,” I thought.

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Companies invest 4x more in M&A than R&D in the USA

I’ve been zooming out to gain a broader perspective of how finance and innovation interact in the economy for my work with the #FounderFriendlyStandard.

I asked the question: How much more money do companies invest in mergers & acquisitions (M&A) than in research and development (R&D)?

Here is the statistic that I found:

Graph showing corporate investments in R&D vs. M&A from 2008 to 2016
This graph shows that between years 2008 and 2016, companies invested 4x more money in mergers and acquisitions (M&A) than in research and development (R&D) in the United States.

The above stat comes from merging two data sources.

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Celebrity moments from the #ATTBizSummit

I’ve tucked away in a break room right now to write this post from the #ATTBizSummit. The event is a shared moment with some of AT&T’s most popular innovations, partners, and customers.

During this morning’s interview, Anderson Cooper asked Thaddeus Arroyo where he could get a pair of AT&T socks. Shortly after, Thaddeus came through.

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4 insightful tweets from #BISummit Dallas

The Brand Innovators Summit stopped by Dallas on October 12, 2017. It was a valuable event for marketers in Dallas. We heard from speakers from AT&T, State Farm, Mary Kay, Yum! Brands, Mimi’s Café, On the Border, and Ted Rubin.

The audience took to Twitter to share insights heard from the stage. Below are my favorite four tweets from the event.

Ted Rubin served as the master of ceremonies. John Stancliffe pointed out two qualities that I also admire in Ted, his candor and insights.

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What makes a thought leader?

Blue fish going one way, being redirected by red fish.
Thought leaders change people’s questions.

Three weeks ago, I told a teacher of mine that I was working on a thought leadership project. “What makes a thought leader?” he asked.

His challenge led me to search for a common thread. I studied titans like the IBM Institute for Business Value, Think with Google, and the US Federal Reserve. Then, I discovered what they had in common. Each changed a predominant question in their field.

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