A 1 star review is OK – sometimes

man-742766_1920
Credit: Ryan McGuire

If you walked by my office in 2015, chances are you would overhear me saying, “It is ok, doctor, that you have this 1 bad review—”

Perfect 5 star ratings are not believable. Now, I have proof! Thanks to Nick Kolenda in What I Learned from Analyzing 12 Million Customer Reviews.

Continue reading

0 Bad Reviews: Imitating Alcoa’s transformation in the information age

Picture of Paul O'Neill from Alcoa
Paul O’Neill transformed Alcoa by changing one keystone habit, safety. Credit: CNN.

Here is how Paul O’Neill introduced himself to a crowd of Wall Street investors when he became the CEO & Chairman of Alcoa in 1987:

“Today, I want to talk to you about worker safety… I intend to make Alcoa the safest company in America. I intend to go for 0 injuries,” he told the Manhattan ballroom.

– The Power of Habit

The investors were dumbfounded because he did not talk about profitability – only safety. A year later, Alcoa’s profits hit a record high. When O’Neill retired in 2000, Alcoa’s market capitalization had increased by $27B. Someone who invested $1M in Alcoa would have earned $1M in dividends, and the value of the shares would have been $5M when O’Neill left.2

Continue reading

My two favorite written portfolio pieces from Review Concierge

My tenure at Review Concierge (2012 – 2015) was a highly educational and (net) rewarding experience. Some of my happiest moments were spent chatting with our nation’s top doctors at all hours of the day and night figuring out how to respond to their online reviews.

While my stories about individual clients are off the record, I did produce quite a few educational stories for the larger community. Many of these portfolio pieces are referenced in the projects section of my LinkedIn profile.

If I were to point to my two favorite written portfolio pieces from my time at Review Concierge, they would be:

  1. Online Review Survival Course
  2. Online Reviews: Leveraging 3 Trends That Brought them Center Stage

These pieces took a great deal of time to distill into written form because they tackle abstract concepts. After spending five hours per night for two weeks (after working full days), I finished the Online Review Survival Course and headed straight to acupuncturist to fix the carpal tunnel that I acquired from writing it. Fortunately, it was fixed in one session.

As I get ready to turn 30, I am upping my commitment to share more of the specialized  knowledge that I regularly invest time acquiring. My hope is that I can share valuable tips that enhance the profitability of  your sales and marketing campaigns.

R.E.S.T. Method for Responding to Reviews

Today I published a one sheet that I’m proud of. It covers how a business can respond to negative reviews online.

In this one sheet, I introduce an acronym, R.E.S.T. It reminds you to be relaxed, empathetic, specific and trustworthy when responding to a bad review online. Special thanks to Logan Lidster for contributing your insights about how to respond to a review and to Nicholas MacConnell for encouraging me to develop an acronym.

What I like most about this piece is that so many complicated lessons have been boiled down into a single sheet of paper that’s understandable and catchy. I guess all those years of brain training are paying off, huh Nic?

I also created a slideshow for the R.E.S.T. method. Hosted by Slideshare.